Pharmacogenetics for Healthcare Professionals

This website is intended to help healthcare professionals understand select pharmacogenetic test results using available FDA label information and independent clinical guidelines* published in peer-reviewed journals.

This information is for reference only and has not been reviewed by the FDA. This information does not constitute medical advice and does not take the place of routine clinical monitoring. Clinicians should use professional judgment in the interpretation of any clinical recommendations.

CYP2C19

The CYP2C19 gene encodes the CYP2C19 enzyme, which helps metabolize many commonly used medications, such as proton pump inhibitors, the antiplatelet clopidogrel, and certain antidepressants.

DPYD

The DPYD gene encodes the DPD enzyme, which helps break down fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy medications, including fluorouracil (5-FU) and capecitabine.

Guideline Overviews and Relevant FDA Label Information

SLCO1B1

The SLCO1B1 gene encodes the SLCO1B1 protein, which helps transport cholesterol-lowering statins into the liver for removal from the body.

Guideline Overviews and Relevant FDA Label Information

*The guidelines referenced herein reflect expert consensus based on clinical evidence and peer-reviewed literature available at the time these guidelines were written and are intended only to assist clinicians in decision making and to identify questions for further research. New evidence may have emerged since the time a guideline was submitted for publication. Guidelines are limited in scope and are not applicable to interventions or diseases that are not specifically identified. Guidelines do not account for individual variations among patients and cannot be considered inclusive of all proper methods of care or exclusive of other treatments. It remains the responsibility of the healthcare provider to determine the best course of treatment for a patient. Adherence to any guideline is voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding its application to be made solely by the clinician and the patient.

Please refer to cpicpgx.org or pharmgkb.org to access the most current guideline content.

Common Questions About 23andMe’s Pharmacogenetics Reports

Common Questions about Pharmacogenetics

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    References

    Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC®). Guidelines. Retrieved February 12, 2020 from cpicpgx.org/guidelines/

    Amstutz U et al. (2018). “Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC®) guideline for dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase genotype and fluoropyrimidine dosing: 2017 update.” Clin Pharmacol Ther. 103(2):210-216.

    Caudle KE et al. (2017). “Standardizing terms for clinical pharmacogenetic test results: consensus terms from the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC®).” Genet Med. 19(2):215-223.

    Caudle KE et al. (2014). “Incorporation of pharmacogenomics into routine clinical practice: the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC®) guideline development process.” Curr Drug Metab. 15(2):209-17.

    Chang KL et al. (2015). “Pharmacogenetics: using genetic information to guide drug therapy.” Am Fam Physician 92(7):588-94.

    Dunnenberger HM et al. (2015). “Preemptive clinical pharmacogenetics implementation: current programs in five US medical centers.” Annu Rev Pharmacol Toxicol. 55:89-106.

    Hicks JK et al. (2017). “Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC®) guideline for CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 genotypes and dosing of tricyclic antidepressants: 2016 update.” Clin Pharmacol Ther. 102(1):37-44.

    Hicks JK et al. (2015). “Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC®) guideline for CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 genotypes and dosing of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.” Clin Pharmacol Ther. 98(2):127-34.

    Moriyama B et al. (2017). “Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC®) guidelines for CYP2C19 and voriconazole therapy.” Clin Pharmacol Ther. 102(1):45-51.

    Ramsey LB et al. (2014). “The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium Guideline for SLCO1B1 and simvastatin-induced myopathy: 2014 update.” Clin Pharmacol Ther. 96(4):423-428. (PMID 24918167)

    Relling MV et al. (2015). “Pharmacogenomics in the clinic.” Nature 526(7573):343-350.

    Relling MV et al. (2011). “CPIC: Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium of the Pharmacogenetics Research Network.” Clin Pharmacol Ther. 89(3):464-7. Website: cpicpgx.org

    Scott SA et al. (2013). “Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium guidelines for CYP2C19 genotype and clopidogrel therapy: 2013 update.” Clin Pharmacol Ther. 94(3):317-23.

    Swen JJ et al. (2011). “Pharmacogenetics: from bench to byte–an update of guidelines.” Clin Pharmacol Ther. 89(5):662-73.

    Whirl-Carrillo M et al. (2012). “Pharmacogenomics knowledge for personalized medicine.” Clin Pharmacol Ther. 92(4): 414-417. Website: pharmgkb.org

    Change Log

    This website may occasionally be updated based on new information.
    This Change Log describes updates and revisions.

    Date

    1 Feb 2020

    Change

    Pharmacogenetics for Healthcare Professionals website created.

    This pharmacogenetics web portal is intended as an educational resource for healthcare professionals practicing in the United States. Please note it is for informational purposes only and includes information that has not been reviewed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

    If you are NOT a licensed healthcare professional, please discuss any questions you have regarding your 23andMe Pharmacogenetics reports with a doctor, pharmacist, or nurse.

    Are you a licensed U.S. healthcare professional?*

    * Healthcare professionals include doctors, nurses, physician assistants, pharmacists, and genetic counselors.